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Plenary Presenters

Opening Plenary:

Dan Bernstein
Professor of Psychology, University of Kansas
Director, Center for Teaching Excellence

Addressing Higher Education's Enduring Challenges: What a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Can Offer

Dan Bernstein is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Kansas and also Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence. His early research focused on human motivation and learning, and more recently he has been studying the development of student understanding in courses with blended face-to-face and online teaching. While at the University of Nebraska Bernstein directed a five-university project on peer review of teaching through external review of electronic course portfolios, resulting in a book co-authored with Nebraska colleagues: Making Teaching and Learning Visible: Course portfolios and the peer review of teaching. A current grant supports faculty colleagues working to enhance writing, critical thinking, and library skills in large undergraduate classes. He was a member of the University of Nebraska Academy of Distinguished Teachers, and he was a Carnegie Scholar in 1998.

Friday plenary: 

Sherry Linkon
Professor of English and American Studies, Youngstown State University, USA

Torgny Roxå
Faculty of Engineering, University of Lund, Sweden

Theorizing the Teaching Commons

Sherry Linkon is a professor of English and American Studies at Youngstown State University (YSU).  She is the co-author with John Russo of Steeltown USA: Work and Memory in Youngstown (University of Kansas, 2002) and the editor of Teaching Working Class (Massachusetts, 1999).  Sherry and John also edited New Working-Class Studies, a collection of essays on approaches to the study of working-class life and culture.  In 1999, she was named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.  She has completed several projects on students' experiences with interdisciplinary learning and has given workshops on teaching, interdisciplinarity, and scholarship of teaching and learning at colleges and universities around the country.  In 2003, she was named the Ohio Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation.

Torgny Roxa has been an academic developer since 1989. Currently, he is currently working within the Faculty of Engineering at Lund University. His main interest is in Strategic Educational Development in Higher Education, a cultural approach where the essentialist and the socio-cultural perspectives are used in combination. He has developed several major measures for change, both at Lund University and nationally in Sweden. He holds a Master in Higher Education from Griffith University, Australia.

Saturday plenary:

Peter Felten
Associate Professor of History, Elon University, USA

Keith Trigwell
Professor of Higher Education in the Insitute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney, Australia

Is SoTL Good for Faculty Professional Development?

Peter Felten is assistant provost, director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, and associate professor of history, at Elon University. He has published widely on engaged learning and the scholarship of teaching, and he is on the editorial boards of the International Journal for Academic Development and the International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Peter is president (2010-2011) of the POD Network, an international association for teaching and learning centers in higher education. His recent research focuses on how students learn and develop in college, and on the possibilities of student-faculty partnerships in the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Keith Trigwell is Professor of Higher Education in the Institute for Teaching and Learning (ITL) at the University of Sydney. He was previously Director of the ITL and of the Oxford Centre for Excellence in Preparing for Academic Practice, a Fellow of Kellogg College and Reader in Higher Education at the University of Oxford. His research interests include investigating qualitative differences in university teaching and students’ learning experiences, teaching-research relations and the scholarship of teaching, including development of the Approaches to Teaching Inventory. This work has yielded more than 100 journal articles, conference papers and books, including Understanding Learning and Teaching: The Experience in Higher Education, which summarises 10 years of research with Professor Michael Prosser. He is a former co-president of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, and in 2010 received a Lifetime Achievement Award (Leadership) from the Society.

Closing plenary:      

Mary Huber
Senior Emerita Scholar, Carnegie Foundation, USA

Pat Hutchings
Vice President, Carnegie Foundation, USA

Tony Ciccone
Professor of French, Director of the Center for Instructional and Professional Development, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Integration and Identity:  Building a Sustainable Future for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Mary Taylor Huber is senior scholar emerita and consulting scholar at The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Involved in research at Carnegie Foundation since 1985, Huber has directed projects on Cultures of Teaching in Higher Education; led Carnegie’s roles in the Integrative Learning Project and the U.S. Professors of the Year Award; and worked closely with the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. She speaks, consults, and writes on the scholarship of teaching and learning, on integrative learning, and on faculty roles and rewards. Co-author of Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate with Charles Glassick and Gene Maeroff (1997), her recent books include Disciplinary Styles in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, co-edited with Sherwyn Morreale (2002); Balancing Acts: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Academic Careers (2004); and The Advancement of Learning: Building the Teaching Commons with Pat Hutchings (2005). Huber is U.S. editor for Arts and Humanities in Higher Education and writes the book review column for Change magazine. A cultural anthropologist, she has also written books and essays on colonial institutions and cultures in Papua New Guinea, and she holds a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Pittsburgh.

Pat Hutchings was the vice president of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching from 2001-2009, and senior scholar there beginning in 1998, when she assumed the role of inaugural director of the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. She has written, spoken, and consulted widely on student outcomes assessment, integrative learning, the investigation and documentation of teaching and learning, the peer collaboration and review of teaching, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Recent publications include The Formation of Scholars: Rethinking Doctoral Education for the Twenty-first Century, with four Carnegie colleagues (2008); The Advancement of Learning: Building the Teaching Commons, with Mary Taylor Huber (2005); Ethics of Inquiry: Issues in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2002); and Opening Lines: Approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2000). Prior to joining Carnegie, she was a senior staff member at the American Association for Higher Education, where she directed the AAHE Assessment Forum (1987-89) and the AAHE Teaching Initiative (1990-98). From 1978-1987 she was a faculty member and chair of the English department at Alverno College. Her doctorate in English is from the University of Iowa.

Anthony (Tony) Ciccone (Ph.D. SUNY/Buffalo) is professor of French and director of the Center for Instructional and Professional Development at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Ciccone is also Senior Scholar and Past Director of the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) at The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Tony has authored a book and several articles on Molière, and two French language textbooks. He has presented the scholarship of teaching and learning nationally and internationally, provided chapters for Campus Progress and Creating a New Kind of University on doing SoTL work at the institutional level, and published his own SoTL research in a special edition of Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. With Pat Hutchings and Mary Huber, he has co-authored The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Reconsidered: Institutional Impact and Integration. Tony is past Director of the Wisconsin Teaching Scholars program, recipient of a Hesburgh Certificate of Excellence in 2005.  He has received an AMOCO Award for Teaching Excellence and the French Teacher of the Year Award from the Wisconsin Association of Foreign Language Teachers. Currently, he teaches a Freshman Seminar, What’s so Funny? Historical and Contemporary Notions of Comedy and Laughter.

 

 


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